Orthelious

A fine gentleman.

A sayer of things.

Twitter: @Orthelious
Recent Tweets @orthelious

orphanwork:

from the series Bole Sol Nihal © Mark Hartman

That. That is a hat.

(via zeropacific)

blazepress:

Aerial Shot of Muhammed Ali after knocking out Cleveland Williams in 1966.

(via thepursuitaesthetic)

likeafieldmouse:

Diana Al-Hadid - The Path of Diminishing Returns (2008)

likeafieldmouse:

Diana Al-Hadid - The Path of Diminishing Returns (2008)

(via sisifo)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

(via proofmathisbeautiful)

99percentinvisible:

The FDA approved XStat, which can seal a gunshot wound in 15 seconds (and will probably save lives in war zones).

Soviet-Era Bootleg Recordings of Banned Western Music Pressed on Discarded X-Ray Plates

junkculture:

(via beyondneptune)

comic-chick:

wombattea:

sizvideos:

How to catch an emu - Video

LET ME TELL YOU A THING

THIS IS A LEGIT THING

THIS IS LITERALLY WHAT PEOPLE DO TO GET EMUS TO COME CLOSE

Apparently you lie on the ground on your back and move your arms and legs.

And the emus are very curious and come over like, “The fuck is that.”

And that’s literally what it is. They come over wondering what the fuck you’re doing

This might be my favorite piece of information I have ever learned.

made my day.

(via kchayka)

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia by night

"When the night comes, the starry sky reflects on its surface like in a mirror, and you have the feeling of being in space."

(via zeropacific)

nevver:

Just another disaster, Dane Whitehurst

(via sisifo)

atavus:

Moisés MahiquesAfter-head Study LVIII, 2011

dibbly:

My dog.